The Sequencing of the Human Genome

The Sequencing of the Human Genome

In what sounds like a bit of deja vu, researchers report final completion of the sequencing of the human genome. If that sounds familiar, it’s because a similar announcement was made in 2001. The caveat? Only 90% of the genome was actually mapped at the time, but further study wasn’t possible due to technological limitations. Among other challenges, digging into the remaining base pairs required access to centromeres within the DNA, which were historically harder to access.

On the journey to full mapping, scientists note that they were surprised by what they found. Repeated sequences, for example, were previously thought to be “junk” DNA, but Time notes that “these repeated sequences, however, may play roles in certain human diseases” and have thus earned deeper scrutiny. A fully sequenced human genome holds the promise of further advances in areas like molecular diagnostics and PCR.

 

https://time.com/6163452/human-genome-fully-sequenced/?utm_campaign=Educational%20Content&utm_content=207419461&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&hss_channel=lcp-69477560